Road Bikes

 

Which Road Bike should I buy?

 

 

Road bikes are also referred to as racing bikes, and feature in races such as the Tour de France or the Tour Down Under. The bikes are also very popular for commuters as well as weekend riders. They are designed to be fast and efficient and hence make use of lightweight frame materials combined with high pressure, narrow tyres. They typically fall into two major categories, drop bar and flat bar. 

Drop bar bikes, feature the “ram horns” type of handle bar, which allows the rider a number of different positions where you can place your hands during longer rides. On modern road bicycles the gear mechanism is integrated into the brake lever both for ergonomics and aerodynamics. 

Broadly speaking drop bar bikes have subcategories including endurance bikes, which are favoured for their more comfortable upright riding position, as well as racing bikes which are feature more aggressive riding positions. Some are also designed with specific aerodynamic characteristics. 

Flat bar bikes have the same frame as drop bar bikes, but feature a mountain bike type handle bar with mountain bike type shifters. This horizontal bar, makes the riding position more upright and comfortable as well. 

All sizes are measured in cm and vary in increments of 2 or 3 cm. 

Similar to other brands such as Giant bicycles or Trek bikes, Polygon bikes come equipped with componenets using the latest in cycling technology such as Shimano, Schwalbe, Ritchey, Mavic and more.

Comparison

CATEGORIES
MODEL
ADVANTAGES
DISADVANTAGES
IDEAL FOR
Endurance Alloy Road Bikes

Endurance Alloy

  • Focused on reliability and ergonomics
  • Light weight endurance alloy road frame 
  • Upright riding position on the bike
  • Extremely durable frame, perfect for commuting
  • Carbon Fork and tapered carbon steerer for improved dampening of any vibrations from the road
  • Affordable price point
  • Not as comfortable as Carbon
  • Alloy frames are slightly heavier than carbon frames
  • Ideal for beginners and intermediate riders that want to take up cycling.
  • Commuters will be pleased with bike and components durability.
Endurance Carbon Road Bikes

Endurance Carbon

  • UCI approved, ready for competition
  • Lightweight Carbon frame helps with climbing and acceleration
  • Upright riding position on the bike 
  • Stiff and responsive frame gives you great power transfer
  • Full Carbon frame and fork dampens vibrations and adds comfort to the ride
  • Endurance specific geometry, ideal for long rides
  • Higher starting price point
  • Pedals not included
  • Not as racing oriented as the Aero Bikes
  • Beginners who are looking for lighter weight and extra comfort.
  • Intermediate and Advanced riders that want an endurance bike for Grand Fondos and hilly rides where a comfortable and efficient riding position is important.
Aero Racing Carbon Road Bikes

Aero Racing Carbon

  • UCI approved racing aerodynamic frame and fork
  • Incredibly stiff frame gives you amazing power transfer
  • Under 900 grams total weight for the frame 
  • Aero Frame and aerodynamic components slice the wind giving you extra speed
  • Carbon frame provides extra comfort on long rides
  • Aggressive riding position doesn't suit all riders
  • No pedals included
  • Not as comfortable as the Endurance Bikes
  • Advanced riders who want an Aero bike.
  • Club racing riders looking for a racing bike.
  • Can be used as a TT and Triathlon Bike.
Flat Bar Road Bikes

Flat Bar

  • Flat handlebar elevates your riding position
  • Focused on reliability and durability
  • Light weight alloy frame with a carbon fork 
  • Alloy frame is perfect for commuting
  • Improved comfort for shorter rides and safer riding with traffic
  • Can be used as a transition bike into road cycling
  • No carbon frame option
  • All rider levels who want to commute to work by bicycle.
  • Beginner road cyclists that find dropbars too aggressive.
  • Riders looking for a Fitness bike
Cyclocross & Gravel Bikes

Cyclocross & Gravel Bikes

  • More upright riding position improves comfort and control over the bike 
  • Wider tyres add comfort and grip
  • Disc brakes provide dependable braking power in all conditions 
  • Great commuter bike
  • Great adventure bike
  • Most durable
  • Slightly heavier
  • Specific wheel hubs, not compatible with traditional road wheels
  • Commuter that wants the added grip of wider tyres and disc brakes.
  • Road cyclist who wants to add a bit of adventure to his or her riding.
  • Cyclocross riders looking for a CX racing bike.

 

Latest Road Bikes Reviews
Polygon Helios C6.0 Carbon Road Bike

Polygon Helios C6.0 Carbon Road Bike

By: on 10 February 2017
I bought this bike as an entry/commuter bike, upgrading from a flat bar Giant Cross City. I am very impressed with the bike so far. I was even more impressed with the service from bicycleonline. The bike was delivered in Canberra the day after I purchased it on their website. Assembly was relatively straightforward. All in all a great experience.
(5)

Polygon Helios C6.0 Carbon Road Bike

Polygon Helios C6.0 Carbon Road Bike

By: on 10 February 2017
I bought this bike as an entry/commuter bike, upgrading from a flat bar Giant Cross City. I am very impressed with the bike so far. I was even more impressed with the service from bicycleonline. The bike was delivered in Canberra the day after I purchased it on their website. Assembly was relatively straightforward. All in all a great experience.
(5)

Polygon Helios C6.0 - Carbon Road Bike, Shimano 105, 22 Speed - Small 50cm

Polygon Helios C6.0 - Carbon Road Bike, Shimano 105, 22 Speed - Small 50cm

By: on 9 January 2017
The bike is unbeatable value for money as a first all day comfort climbers/endurance bike. At the price point the differences between this and the Helios 8.0 are the mechanical groupset, 105 vs Ultegra, and the wheels: RS21 vs RS81. If this is your first bike then the cheaper options are probably better for you anyway. 105 gears are simpler to use and don't require the finessing possible like Ultegra on the downshifts with the option for multi-shifting. Plus any replacement parts are cheaper and after the first year or two you can probably start upgrading worn components to Ultegra anyway as your riding will naturally be more experienced/efficient by then (namely in gear selection). The wheels are more significant but again for that first year do you really want to be hitting all those potholes/obstructions with carbon composite wheels anyway. The price of upgrading to the RS81s later is less than the difference between the 6.0 and 8.0 so when you are ready you can enjoy the difference when you are better able to avoid the obstacles and keep the wheels in better condition longer. The heavier RS21s are more robust and able to take an odd impact without re-truing and can continue as your 2nd training pair when you do splurge on some performance wheels. The drawbacks seems specific to the small frame size. I'm assuming all parts are the same for all frame sizes so this means things like cable lengths will be perfect for the largest size and a bit exaggerated fro the small. So be prepared for lots of big cable loops in front of the handlebars. It would be good if these could be trimmed accordingly during the bike build as would make for a much cleaner look. There is also an issue with the location of the water bottle cage bolts. Ideally these should be as low as possible as in their current position it is not possible to place a normal sized 750ml bottle down into a seat tube cage. There is simply not enough room under the top tube. A side pull bidon cage might allow access but even this will not allow a Magnum 1 litre bottle as I like to use. So ideally these bolt holes could be placed as low as possible on future models, as does not matter if they are lower than the derailleur mount as this is the case on my old bike and is never a problem. The bidon cage can always easily be removed if for any reason. And lastly there should be some mention of the possibility of cable stretch when the bike is packed back into the shipping box after the pro build. As the handlebars is such a tricky sideways fit into the box, the cables will be pulled and twisted to one side which means when you put it back together the gears may need some adjusting. This is covered in the included bike manual but also note in my one, the location of the index screws was illustrated the wrong way around. So perhaps just looking at one of the hundreds of YouTube videos will get you through and out riding enjoying this great bike.
(4)

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